Killer Pursuit by Jeff Gunhus: Book Blitz

Thriller
Date Published: January 18, 2016

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When a secret webcam is found in the Georgetown bedroom of a murdered high-society call girl, everyone in Washington, DC wants the recording…especially the killer. 
After a high-society call girl is brutally murdered in her Georgetown home, investigators find two cameras hidden in the walls of her bedroom. One has its memory erased, presumably by the murderer. The second is a webcam with an encrypted connection…and no-one knows who’s on the other end. Whoever has the recordings has embarrassing leverage against some of the most powerful men in DC, not to mention a video of the murder showing the identity of the killer.
FBI Special Agent Allison McNeil is asked by beleaguered FBI Director Clarence Mason to run an off-the-record investigation of the murder because of the murder’s similarity to a case she worked a year earlier. Allison knows the most direct path to apprehending the killer is to find the videos, but rumors that the victim’s client list may include some of Washington’s most powerful men makes her doubt the director’s motives. As she starts her investigation, she quickly discovers that she’s not the only one pursuing the recording…but that the most aggressive person racing against her might be the murderer himself.
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About the Author

Jeff Gunhus is the author thriller and horror novels for adults and the middle grade/YA series, The Templar Chronicles. The first book, Jack Templar Monster Hunter, was written in an effort to get his reluctant reader eleven-year old son excited about reading. It worked and a new series was born. His books for adults have reached the Top 100 on Amazon and have been Foreword Reviews Book of the Year Finalists.
After his experience with his son, he is passionate about helping parents reach young reluctant readers and is active in child literacy issues. As a father of five, he leads an active lifestyle in Maryland with his wife Nicole by trying to constantly keep up with their kids. In rare moments of quiet, he can be found in the back of the City Dock Cafe in Annapolis working on his next novel.
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The Inconvenient Unborn — guest post by author

Title: The Inconvenient Unbornv1

Author: David Carter

Genre: Family Drama / Political Thriller

England in the near future –

Though you may not like what you see.

 

The Cazenoves and the Wilsons don’t get along, leastways the parents don’t – the teenage kids adore each other, but when the oldest Wilson girl falls pregnant, sparks fly.

Donald Cazenove just happens to be Fred Wilson’s boss, but Fred isn’t without influence himself, being the senior shop steward, and the business is struggling anyway, and a strike could play havoc with Donald’s figures.

“The Inconvenient Unborn” is set in England in the near future where after years of austerity, a left wing Labour Party has been returned to power with a huge majority, and they now intend to change Britain forever. They have a mandate. They have conviction. They have momentum.

And then there’s a state visit to Britain by the most powerful man on the planet, Yuri Premakov, the Russian President, and his precocious and very beautiful film star wife, Tamara, bringing gifts of gas and oil and energy, at a price, and he’s scheduled to visit Lymington on the south coast, where most of this book is set.

So who wins out? The Cazenoves or the Wilsons, and what exactly are Yuri Premakov and his vast entourage up to in Britain?

“The Inconvenient Unborn” will take you on a journey you can barely imagine.




Book Excerpt

To put this into context, Oliver Cazenove, the guy, is eighteen going on nineteen, and still at school, while the girl, Sue, is thirty, with a penchant for younger men. She works behind the bar at Olly’s local pub, which is where he met her. 

Oliver was the first to leave the house at twenty to eight. His big hair had dried, but it still had that just washed and fluffy look, but no matter how roughly he treated it, it always seemed to fall back into perfect place, and he was grateful for that.

He was standing self-consciously outside Bestdas Supermarket by five to eight and though he knew his father was not inside, many of the people who worked there were aware he was the boss’s son. The sooner Sue arrived and whisked him away the better, and it was five past when the cream and maroon Cayton Cerisa whizzed up and abruptly stopped before him.

The passenger window was open and she leant across and smiled through it and said, ‘Don’t I know you? Would you like a lift?’

‘Damn right I would,’ grinned Olly, as he jumped inside, as Sue hit the accelerator before he’d even had time to plug in his belt.

‘Where do you fancy going?’ she said, taking her eyes off the road, and glancing at the big kid with the newly washed hair beside her. He smelt good too, looked good and smelt good, what more could a young woman want, and she was still young too at just thirty, though nowhere near as young as him. There was no law against it, was there? He was old enough and perfectly legal and fit and able, and that was all that mattered

‘Don’t mind,’ he said, ‘you choose, but somewhere away from Lymington, eh?’

‘Oh yes,’ she said, ‘somewhere well away from here,’ and she headed across town and zipped onto the Brockenhurst road.

The radio was on, one of the local music stations, and The 27 Club came on.

‘Turn it up!’ he said.

‘Do you like these?’ she said, smiling and shaking her head.

‘They are brill, simply the best!’

‘Don’t see it myself, don’t see what all the fuss is about.’

‘It’s probably an age thing,’ he said, in all seriousness.

‘Oh, thanks, Olly!’

‘Sorry, Sue, I didn’t mean you’re old or anything, ’cos obviously you are not, but I think they appeal more to the teens and twenties.’

‘I’m not that long away from being a twenty,’ she pouted, and accelerated hard through the New Forest, slowing to avoid falling foul of the obligatory radar trap.

‘I know that,’ he said, ‘and you certainly don’t look old either, you look…’ and he left the sentence hanging in the air.

‘Yeah? I look what?’

He stole another peek at her.

‘You look absolutely fab actually, really beautiful,’ and she did too, in a low cut skimpy summer dress that showed off her breasts wonderfully.

Sue’s mouth fell open. Like most women she adored compliments, but one from a young kid like Olly, so sincerely said, well that was something else. She’d always known she’d liked him, but the way he spoke, and his appearance, and the way he looked at her, had an effect that was indeed special.

There followed a few moments of silence before Olly asked, ‘So, where are we going?’

‘There’s a couple of nice pubs on the Totton road from Lyndhurst,’ she said, ‘backing onto the forest. We could have a little walk too, if you want.’

A walk too, if you want, he pondered on her words, in the forest on a warm summer’s evening. What was there not like about that?

‘Great,’ he said. ‘Suits me.’

‘Have you eaten?’

‘Nope. You?’

‘I have not, thought we could get a bite to eat too.’

‘Sounds good, I’ve a huge appetite.’

‘I’ll bet you have,’ she said, grinning across at him, and they both laughed aloud.

******

For many scribblers the most enjoyable part is the actual writing, while the least enjoyable is the time spent marketing and selling one’s work, and even the most famous writers have to spend time doing that.

   Self published and small press authors have to devote a large chunk of their time to the marketing operation, for if they didn’t they wouldn’t sell any books.

   All marketing operations can be roughly divided into two sections: old technology and new technology. Old tech includes newspapers, magazines, posters, cards, and radio and TV, while new tech refers to Internet publicity and social media.

   Far and away the most successful for me, (so far!) has been through articles in old-fashioned newspapers. One large paper devoted almost half a page to me and my writing, and imagine how much coverage like that would have cost via paid for advertising. I sold several hundred books from that article alone, and I achieved all that by simply dropping them a line and telling them about my books.

   Similarly, a lady friend of mine, who runs a poetry club and had recently completed a book of poetry, rang up the local radio station and mentioned her club and her new book, and they immediately asked her round to talk about her book and club members on air, and that she did the very next morning. Again, imagine how much that kind of coverage would have cost in paid for advertising.

   It can often be a case of “if you don’t ask, you don’t get” – so if you have a book to publicise don’t forget to include old style media in your publicity campaign. Yes, you will be ignored and turned down many many times. Get used to it, develop a thick skin and keep at it, and on the occasions when you are featured, (maybe it just happened to be a slow news day that day, but you won’t care about that), then it will all be worthwhile.

   Of course the Internet and social media are very important too, and in many ways for the more timid amongst us they are the easiest to do, as anyone can sit anonymously behind a computer and send out tweets, or pay someone else to do so, and advertise on Facebook, but if you imagine that will simply being in hundreds of sales then you are destined to be disappointed. The easiest option is often the least successful.

   To achieve success you have to be more imaginative, you have to stand out from the very large crowd, by bringing something new and fresh to your publicity efforts, so be creative.

   Bookblog tours are certainly worth considering too, for the tour operators will save you oodles of time, for you only have send the information to the tour organiser once, and they will do all the rest for you.

   And don’t forget to make a list of all your local bookstores and visit them too. If you are a true bookhound you will probably know them already, and you may well be known in there too, and most bookstore owners will be only too pleased to stop and talk about your book, and space permitting, will be happy to put some copies on their shelves, especially if you are offering them on a sale or return basis. I find independent bookshops are much better for this than the big chains.

   Never lose sight of the end goal of making your work known and available to your potential readers. Yes, it will cost some money and a great deal of time, but without investing that effort and money you will be destined to keep hold of those precious books of yours for a very long time indeed.

   Books rarely sell themselves; you have to do that, so stick at it, and get in the habit of doing something to promote your work every day. Do that and you will be successful, just so long as you have written a good book in the first place!

*****

Author Bio

I have been writing for longer than I care to remember. Even as a ten year old child I would design my own newspaper and fill it with family news, much to my mother’s amusement when she once found a copy containing a story that she didn’t fully approve of!

My writing started seriously when I was in business and I was approached to write a column, and that developed into writing columns for newspapers and magazines in many fields, including computing, commodities, farming, property, sport, philately, business and small business, many of which I have actually been paid good money for, and that always brings a nice feeling that never goes away.

My syndicated online articles have now been read by over 300,000 people across the globe and show no sign of slowing down.

It was a fairly small step after that to writing books and I have now written more than a dozen, both fiction and non fiction, and I try to write and complete at least one full length book every year.

Like most writers and aspiring writers I have many more in the pipeline, both part finished, abandoned, or in an unedited state, and finding the time to complete them is always the big enemy there.

Ideally, I would like to find a literary agent who could assist me in taking my writing to the next level, so if you are out there and you like what you see and read then do please get in touch.

Besides writing I sell books for a living and currently have more than 10,000 titles in the house and please don’t ask me where they all are because the simple answer is that they are pretty much everywhere!

I am currently working on a new Inspector Walter Darriteau novel and after that I may go back to writing a sequel to Gringo Greene, though ordinarily I prefer to write something completely fresh, rather than revisiting old ground.

It always amazes me that someone like Lee Child can write book after book featuring the same character and similar adventures, though all best wishes to him for he has been incredibly successful.

 

Website: http://www.davidcarterbooks.co.uk/

Accidental Droning by Pete Liebengood – PROMO Blitz

Contemporary Adventure Thriller
Date Published: February 2015

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Accidental Drowning has been optioned for a possible movie adaption by a Hollywood producer.
Bo Granger loses his job as the manager of a country club golf shop and turns to flying his private drone as a pastime.
Accidentally he captures video with his drone of a woman being murdered by drowning. Bo is torn over whether or not to turn his video over to authorities. He is afraid of reprisal by the person who owns the mansion where the drowning took place, and he worries that his invasion of privacy will derail his wife’s campaign to become governor of California as she is defined as a state legislator by her privacy platform.
Bo endures a series of misadventures as he wrestles with doing the right thing. He is nearly shot to death by a goon hired by the dead woman’s husband, he’s falsely charged with sexual assault by his wife’s housekeeper in a dirty politics scheme, and he gets involved in a torrid romance with a female newspaper reporter who is determined to get the story of a lifetime
Excerpt
The line of club members was out the door. Sequoia Country Club’s pro shop was under siege from filthy-rich golfers—club initiation fees had recently topped three hundred thousand dollars—wanting the newly arrived, multicolored umbrellas. Part of the reason for the unusual customer demand was a steady rain that had swept across the peninsula in the early morning hours. Another was the genius of shop manager Bo Granger, who’d paid a meteorologist out of his own pocket for a long-range forecast the week before. Even though April was still considered the rainy season in the Bay Area, he’d gambled on a big storm hitting precisely on the morning of the club invitational, which boasted a field of 150 golfers. He’d ordered three-dozen of the splashy Leroy Neiman–like designer umbrellas that featured a well in the shaft suitable for housing airplane-sized bottles of booze. He’d been smart, too, in sending e-mail notices to all members announcing his upcoming rainy-day special. Bo figured the huge run on club merchandise was going to be a hit with his new general manager.
Bo had been with the club a little over four years. He’d felt secure enough in his position to warrant this bravado with the umbrellas. Even at a discounted seventy-five dollars a pop, he stood to rake in sales of $2,700 if he could unload three dozen. It was not yet nine thirty in the morning, and he’d sold twenty-four.
Bo was well regarded by the majority of the club’s 550 members, most of them Silicon Valley millionaires. In addition to being a shrewd buyer and mover of golf merchandise, he was very likeable. He had a way of making every club member who came into his shop feel special—especially the good-looking women. He’d almost married one of the better-looking ones, Sally Anne Perkins. She was the daughter of a venture capitalist and had graduated a few years back from the prestigious Stevenson College in New Hampshire with a degree in “green anything.” During the time Bo dated her, she didn’t work; in fact she’d never had a job—didn’t need one with Daddy’s money. She mostly stayed at home and watched game shows. Despite her abundant free time, she didn’t volunteer much—the annual beach cleanup along the San Martin County coastline being the exception. After dating for a year and a half, they broke up. Sally Anne had caught Bo tossing recyclable materials into the garbage yet again. She took a picture of him in the act and posted it on Instagram with the tag, “Should I marry a man who’s this insensitive to our carbon footprint?” She received 547 responses saying no.
Bo got his name from his younger sister. She couldn’t say Robert—it came out Bobo—so his parents went with the abbreviation. Bo’s personality was pleasing. He’d been brought up to be liked by Elaine, a housewife, and Steven Granger, a Walgreen’s pharmacist. “Pleasing people will get you further in life than any degree,” his father had preached. Life with Elaine and Steven was vanilla. Steven made him join the Boy Scouts; Elaine made him play the piano. The most childhood excitement Bo could remember was a road trip to LA where he and his sister, Bobbie, were treated to entire days at Disneyland and Knott’s Berry Farm.
Bo attended Lowell High School in San Francisco, where he failed to distinguish himself as either an exceptional student or athlete—although he did play number three on the golf team—but as a senior was voted Best Personality over a guy who went on to be a nationally recognized comedian.
Bo attended San Francisco State and got his BA in business in four years. It wasn’t until his junior year that he figured out what he wanted to do with his life. He played for State’s golf team and set his mind to becoming a PGA instructor after he graduated. He figured he could make a good living at it and be exposed to beautiful women who were eager for him to teach them the game. Part of that reasoning was fostered by his good looks. His dark, wavy hair, movie-star-like strong jawline, and penetrating hazel eyes had served him well with college co-eds. He’d left a trail of brokenhearted young girls behind him at State. One of his rejections was good-looking enough to land spots in two different national TV commercials. “I dated the Chick-fil-A girl,” he was proud of saying.
Unfortunately, Bo never reached his goal of being a PGA-sanctioned teaching pro—three times he’d failed at putting together the requisite successive rounds of eighty-two or better. That was the golf world’s equivalent of “three strikes and you’re out.” His last opportunity to qualify was at the California Club in South San Francisco. Bo had carded an eighty and an eighty-two on his first two rounds. He was confident that he could post one more round under eighty-two—too confident. His premature celebration the night before his final round did him in. He wasn’t normally a cocktail drinker—he mostly stuck with beer—but the vodka gimlets he was offered by a fellow competitor’s caddy in the club’s bar went down way too easily and too often. By eight o’clock that evening, he had to be carried into the men’s locker room, where club members constructed a bed out of bench pads and left him there to sleep it off. It didn’t help that Bo had an eight o’clock tee time in the morning. It was the par-three, two-hundred-yard twelfth hole that killed him. Sitting at seven over par through eleven holes, he was just three strokes under the dreaded eighty-two-stroke maximum.
About the Author

Pete Liebengood is a retired TV sportscaster (KRON-TV San Francisco and a past play-by-play contributor to ESPN. He’s authored two other novels, “Class of ’62” and “Honeyball.”
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Blood Diamond by RJ Blain: Author Interview

Blood Diamond

Paranormal Suspense / Urban Fantasy / Supernatural Thriller / Light Paranormal Romance
Date Published: June 25, 2015
 
 

The world is full of corpses, and Jackson knows them by name. When a group strives to destroy the Inquisition, his powers may be all standing between the supernaturals and extinction.

However, when he learns the truth behind the deaths of his wife and unborn daughter, Jackson may prove to be the greatest threat of all to the survival of mankind…

***

What living person do you most admire? 

This is a terrible thing to say, but most of the people I admire are dead—and have been for a long time. I’m a bit of a hermit, which doesn’t help things, either. I don’t admire a lot of the famous people, mainly because the media rarely tells the full truth about them.

So, it’s cliché, but I’m going to go with my husband. He puts up with me each and every day, and there’s no one out there who can top that—because he does so by choice… and that’s a pretty spectacular thing.

We’ve been married for thirteen years now, and that’s saying something about his special sort of crazy.

What is your most prized possession? 

My Levenger Circa journals. They contain all of my writing notes, which is extremely precious to me. My macbook pro comes a close second, since I write the novels on it…! I love office supplies, but my journals and their precious pages are my most prized possessions.

Who is your favorite fictional character of all time? 

This is worse than asking me what my favorite book is… so many wonderful characters, so little time. Do I really have to choose one? This is like telling me to go into a bookstore and saying I can only buy one book. Just one?

I… I…

Fine. I’ll pick FitzChivalry from Robin Hobb’s Farseer etc trilogies. He’s definitely up there… and if he doesn’t get a happy ending by the end of the current trilogy, I will be ruined. There are so many reasons to love Fitz… and hate that he always, always seems to get the short end of the straw. I hope he gets a Happily Ever After. Of all of the characters I’ve read—and loved—he truly deserves it.

Caz from The Curse of Chalion is an honorable mention.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? 

Ironically, FitzChivalry’s existence. That character doesn’t catch a break ever. The books are so good, but the depth of misery this character endures is epic. I’m of the opinion if you want someone to suffer, make them walk in Fitz’s shoes a while.

Why do you write? 

Is it terribly cliché of me to say ‘Because I must?’ I don’t think I could stop at this point. Writing is such an integral part of who I am, I’m not sure I could walk away from it now.

I love everything to do with writing, but I want to entertain and give readers a chance to escape their reality for a while and step into a new world. I was a practitioner of escapism as a teen and young adult, and I want to pass that on.

I write because I love books… and I love people who love books, too. It may be such a canned answer, but it’s the truth. I write to entertain, but I write for myself as much as I write for fans.

Where would you most like to live? 

California… and I get to move there in the near future. Yep, I get to check an item off my to-do-before-I-die bucket list!

I’d say Yellowstone, but I don’t think they’d let me live in the park.

What is your motto? 

Sit down, shut up, and get the <bleep> to work. Yep, I’m one of those ass in chair and type types. My solution to most of my problems is “work harder.”

Who’s your favorite writer? 

This is almost as bad as asking me who my favorite character is. Do I really have to pick one?

I’m a rebel. I’ll pick a few. I can’t just pick one.

In no particular order… Brandon Sanderson, Patricia Briggs, Jim Butcher, Robin Hobbs, Diana Pharaoh Francis, Mercedes Lackey, Vince Flynn, Tom Clancy.

I could go on all day, but here’s a good start…

Happy reading!

***

RJ Blain suffers from a Moleskine journal obsession, a pen fixation, and a terrible tendency toRJ Blain - Author Photo pun without warning.

When she isn’t playing pretend, she likes to think she’s a cartographer and a sumi-e painter. In reality, she herds cats and a husband, and obeys the commands of Tsu Dhi, the great warrior fish.

In her spare time, she daydreams about being a spy. Should that fail, her contingency plan involves tying her best of enemies to spinning wheels and quoting James Bond villains until she is satisfied.

Contact Links:

Website: http://rjblain.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/RJ-Blain/121746651191778

Twitter: https://twitter.com/rj_blain

Purchase Link:

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Blood-Diamond-Witch-Wolf-Book-ebook/dp/B010FAGRC4/

 

The Dollhouse in the Crawlspace by Ellen Byerrum: Author Interview

MediaKit_BookCover_TheDollhouseInTheCrawlspaceIf you lost your memories, would you lose your soul?

“In my memories, my eyes are always green.” After a devastating accident, a young woman finds herself recovering in a memory research facility. Her eyes are brown; her memories are broken. Years of her life are blank, yet she remembers being two very different women, one called Tennyson, the other Marissa. If she can’t trust her memories or her own eyes, who can she trust? To save her sanity and her life, she begins a secret journal between the lines of Homer’s Odyssey—and her own harrowing odyssey into madness and murder. Lost among her shattered memories, can she find her true self?

***

Ellen Byerrum will be awarding a $25 Amazon or Barnes and Noble GC to a randomly drawn winner via rafflecopter during the tour.

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***

excerpt:

The nightmare came again last night.

The cast-off thoughts of an incubus haunt me and press me and smother me while I sleep. Recurring and mutating, but always returning to taunt me. It calls me out of the Fog.

In the dream, I am running. It is very dark and the only thing I can see is the dim outline of a house. It resembles the home I lived in growing up. The home of one of me, anyway. It’s a little two-story white Victorian cottage with green shutters and trim, only three feet tall. There are lights on inside and the tiny door swings open for me. With every step I take I shrink, until I am almost small enough to fit through the front door. Something is hard upon my heels. Someone calls my name. This time, I can’t quite remember if the voice calls for Tennyson or Marissa. I’m almost home, almost up the front steps and through the door. But I never quite make it.

My face was wet with tears when I woke up, my heart beating like a drum in my chest, a sour taste in my mouth. Despite feeling like someone was in the room watching me, I was alone. I was conscious of the ever-present camera, but it was dark. I put my hand on my chest and willed my heart to slow down.

The first time I had the dream, weeks ago now, Giles was there beside me, suddenly turning on the bedside lamp. The glare hurt my eyes. “Tennyson, are you all right?” He reached for my wrist to take my pulse. He wore a T-shirt and silk boxer shorts. “What is it?”

 ***

interview:

Tell us about this story.

In The Dollhouse in the Crawlspace, Tennyson Claxton is a young woman who finds herself in a memory research institute, after being in a near-fatal car accident.  In her memories her eyes are green, but in the mirror her eyes are brown. Her memories come and go. She finds she has a fiancé she doesn’t like, a family she doesn’t remember. With multiple deaths around her, she must risk danger to discover her true self.

What living person do you most admire?

I don’t know her name but she’s the woman you see everywhere. She’s the woman who’s holding everything together in spite of life’s constant blows. She’s a survivor. I see her at the grocery store, in the park, at church. She’s everywoman.

What is your most prized possession?

My brain. Without that, I have nothing.

Who is your favorite fictional character of all time?

It changes over time. When I was a child it might have been Cathy Earnshaw from Wuthering Heights, or Jane Eyre.  But I reread an Elizabeth Peters book last week. So this week, my favorite character is Amelia Peabody.

Who’s the favorite character that you created?

They’re all my favorite characters as I write them. But it is a tie between Lacey Smithsonian from my Crime of Fashion mysteries and Tennyson Claxton from The Dollhouse in the Crawlspace.

What’s your idea of perfect happiness?

I don’t dwell on perfect happiness. I’d settle for general happiness. With my husband, my friends, good books, conversation and theater.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

I would like to be more organized to be able to write faster and produce more books in shorter periods in time.

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?

Not exactly what I like to dwell on. But I think misery involves poverty, lack of opportunity, and no way out. The lowest misery is being without hope.

Why do you write?

Writing is my strongest skill.

Where would you most like to live?

I spent many years in Virginia and worked in Washington, D.C. It’s the location I write about the most.  I fell in love with the East Coast and would love to call it home again. At least part-time.

What is your motto?

Never give up.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ellen Byerrum is a novelist, playwright, reporter, former Washington D.C. journalist, and a graduate of private investigator

AuthorPhoto_TheDollhouseInTheCrawlspaceschool in Virginia. The Dollhouse in the Crawlspace is her first suspense thriller, which introduces Tennyson Claxton, a woman with two sets of memories from two very different women.

Ellen also writes the Crime of Fashion mysteries, which star a savvy, stylish female sleuth named Lacey Smithsonian, a reluctant fashion reporter in Washington D.C. (“The City Fashion Forgot”).Two of the COF books,Killer Hair and Hostile Makeover, were filmed for the Lifetime Movie Network and can occasionally be seen on odd dates and odd times in the middle of the night. The latest book in that series is Lethal Black Dress, but there will be more to come.

She has also penned a middle grade mystery, The Children Didn’t See Anything. She occasionally writes a newsletter that contains her latest publishing information.

You can find more about Ellen on her website at www.ellenbyerrum.com

Twitter https://twitter.com/EllenByerrum,

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EllenByerrum

Facebook Author Page https://www.facebook.com/EllenByerrumBooks

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Short Stories by Thomas Ryan: Book Blitz

Suspense/Thriller/Short Stories
Date Published: January 2014

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From Best Selling Author of The Jeff Bradley Thriller Series Thomas Ryan is a collection of suspense/thriller short stories.
Award winning thriller novelist, Thomas Ryan, is a prolific writer of short stories. Ryan’s short story’s span the spectrum of human emotions, from the creepy ‘Nightmares’, to the fun and humour of ‘The World’s Biggest Bun’. Ryan believes all good short stories should have unexpected twists and turns. Applying his thriller writing skills he manages to achieve this end and readers will find Ryan’s short story writing gripping but also easy to read. Quoting a recent review, ‘these are very intriguing, original stories, all well written and enjoyable. Ryan really gets inside his characters and makes their world our world, whatever its moral code or unwritten rules. These stories are powerful and stay with you once you’ve finished them.
Volume Two Was Released in February 2015 – Short Stories Volume 2”: Incudes ‘John Wayne’ and ‘Gerry’
EXCERPT
Ruth
After hitting the kitchen floor and suffering the sickening sensation of her head bouncing off the grey slate, Ruth Deverett found her vision blurry. Squinting eyes couldn’t make out the position of the hands on the wall clock above the fridge. No matter. She knew it was six o’clock. There was no mistaking the news signature tune streaming from the television set in the lounge.
And the day?
Easy.
From the cheese and garlic aromas in her nostrils, the dish now splattered across the floor could only have been lasagna. Robert demanded she keep a strict mealtime regimen. Roast on Sunday, steak on Monday, curry on Tuesday and….
Lasagna on Wednesday.
So, Wednesday it was.
A cautious hand lifted from the tiles and drew up the rough weave of her husband-prescribed white linen apron. Tips of fingers gently patted the side of her head. A wince as Ruth encountered a newly formed lump.
Her head never used to jar this badly when it hit vinyl. She had argued with Robert against replacing the vinyl, but as usual a forceful justification of the soundness of his decision had silenced her. How fortunate, Ruth continually reminded herself, to have a husband who was so supremely confident of the correctness of his opinions.
Out the corner of her eye she caught sight of a movement. A defensive hand flew to her side. A boot deflected off her wrist and into her thigh. Needles of pain stabbed through her upper arm. She knew another blow would come and squeezed her eyes tight. She worried her wrist might be broken. How could she iron Robert’s shirt in the morning with a broken wrist? Her own fault really, she should not have tried to defend herself. Robert had repeatedly yelled at her not to do so. It only made him angrier.
She should apologise for her foolishness. After all, Robert only ever offered helpful advice.
Without opening her eyes Ruth curled into a fetal position and waited. The toe of Robert’s boot tapped against the table leg. She sensed him looking down at her, almost certainly disgusted by her weakness and deliberating his next move. This usually meant he was calming. She held her breath, guarding against sound. A groan would set him off again. She ached, but it wasn’t so bad. Not as bad as other times.
She heard the news reader introduce a news bulletin.
That meant the ad break was over. Robert would not miss the news, not on her account.
A bowl smashed against the wall. Ruth flinched. Lettuce and tomato sprinkled across her exposed calf. Shards of crockery skittered across the floor. This was a good sign. Robert only threw dishes at the wall when it was over. A final vent. Footsteps moved away from her. The sound became muffled. He’d reached the thickness of the broadloom carpet in the sitting room.
“Don’t move yet,” she whispered. “Not yet.”
About the Author

Award winning novelist, Thomas Ryan, has been a soldier in a theatre of war, he has traded in Eastern Europe, trampled the jungles of Asia, and struggled through the trials of love and loss. Armed with these life experiences Ryan turned to writing thriller novels and short stories. Ryan considers himself a story teller, a creator who has enthusiastically plunged his psyche into the world of creativity and fantasy. With the reader in mind he weaves colourful characters into the threads of his riveting storylines. Taking readers on a thrilling journey is what motivates Ryan as a writer. Find out more about Thomas Ryan and his books on his official website http://www.thomasryanwriter.com
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Author Interview: The Girl in the Maze by R.K. Jackson

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Genre: Thriller

Perfect for fans of Gillian Flynn, Paula Hawkins, and Tana French, R. K. Jackson’s lyrical, twisty psychological thriller debut follows an aspiring journalist as she uncovers dark truths in a seaswept Southern town—aided by a mysterious outcast and pursued by a ruthless killer.

When Martha Covington moves to Amberleen, Georgia, after her release from a psychiatric ward, she thinks her breakdown is behind her. A small town with a rich history, Amberleen feels like a fresh start. Taking a summer internship with the local historical society, Martha is tasked with gathering the stories of the Geechee residents of nearby Shell Heap Island, the descendants of slaves who have lived by their own traditions for the last three hundred years.

As Martha delves into her work, the voices she thought she left behind start whispering again, and she begins to doubt her recovery. When a grisly murder occurs, Martha finds herself at the center of a perfect storm—and she’s the perfect suspect. Without a soul to vouch for her innocence or her sanity, Martha disappears into the wilderness, battling the pull of madness and struggling to piece together a supernatural puzzle of age-old resentments, broken promises, and cold-blooded murder. She finds an unexpected ally in a handsome young man fighting his own battles. With his help, Martha journeys through a terrifying labyrinth—to find the truth and clear her name, if she can survive to tell the tale.



What inspired your latest work?

Numerous visits, both as a child and as an adult, to Georgia’s hauntingly beautiful, marsh-fringed Golden Isles. Discovering the unique and threatened culture of the Geechees, direct descendants of slaves who have lived for centuries in near-isolation.  The book also drew upon my early career experiences as a small-town newspaper journalist. 

Tell us about this story.


It’s the story of Martha Covington, an aspiring journalist who recently suffered a psychotic break. She has taken an internship with the Historical Society of Amberleen, Georgia, and is given the task of collecting the oral history of the residents of Shell Heap Island, descendants of slaves who have lived by their own traditions for the last three hundred years.

As Martha delves into her work, the voices she thought she left behind start whispering again, and she begins to doubt her recovery. When a grisly murder occurs, Martha finds herself at the center of a perfect storm—and she’s the perfect suspect.

What living person do you most admire?

It’s a tie—my mother and my father.

What is your most prized possession?

A collection of photo albums that my wife put together that documents our travels, hikes, and explorations during the first decade of our marriage.

Who is your favorite fictional character of all time?

Calvin of “Calvin and Hobbes.”

Who’s the favorite character that you created?

Martha, the protagonist of THE GIRL IN THE MAZE. Lenny, her imaginary companion with the Liverpool accent, is a close second.

What’s your idea of perfect happiness?

Being completely lost in the flow of a creative project is one of my favorite kinds of rush.

 

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be? 

I would become more outgoing, more comfortable with self-promotion.

 

What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?

Yard work.



Author Bio

R.K. Jackson is an award-winning science writer and editor at NASA, and previously worked as a senior editor at CNN, where he helped launch the network’s Internet presence. He has attended the Advanced Novel Writing Workshop at UCLA as well as the Squaw Valley Community of Writers Workshop.

Jackson’s debut novel, THE GIRL IN THE MAZE (available 9/8 from Random House Alibi), has been praised as “A twisty Southern gothic thriller with echoes of Tana French” (L.A. Times bestselling author Dianne Emley), “A terrific mystery” (The Book Lover’s Friend), and “A fast-paced psychological thriller that keeps you engaged from beginning to end” (Reading Femme).

Two of his plays have been staged professionally, and his short story, “All the Devils,” was featured in the Alfred Hitchcock-themed issue of Penumbra Magazine. He is currently consulting with Disney’s Imagineers on the forthcoming “Spaceship of the Imagination” attraction at EPCOT.

A Georgia native with roots in the state’s coastal low country, he now lives with his family in California’s Los Padres National Forest and is at work on a second Martha Covington thriller, THE KISS OF THE SUN.

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